How to experience Little Corn Island like an expat

Land-for-Sale-on-Little-Corn-island

Little Corn Island is a new arrival to the Central American/Caribbean tourist scene, and the big reason why it has arrived has everything to do with a small but growing population of expats that have made this place their home.

With word getting out to the outside world about land for sale on Little Corn Island that boasts amazing Caribbean views for a fraction of the price that one would pay on more established islands, increasing attention has been paid to this former backwater.

In this article, we will share a few tips on how to experience Little Corn Island like a long-stay expat rather than as a tourist…

Speak with the locals

The people that live on Little Corn have been here for generations. Though tourism has been on the increase in recent years, the majority of them have not been jaded by the crowds that plague other destinations in the Caribbean.

Unlike the rest of Nicaragua, the people here speak English, so don’t be shy: strike up a conversation about what goes on in their daily lives.

The same goes for expats: if you want to understand why they have made this place their permanent home, don’t be afraid to ask questions when you’re having some Flor de Cana together at Tranquilo Cafe.

Eat at restaurants that serve Nicaraguan/Creole cuisine

While places like Tranquilo Cafe or Cafe Desederi should be visited on more than once during your stay on Little Corn Island, the best way to eat like an expat here is to sit down at a restaurant run by an islander.

At these eateries, the cooks are skilled in the art of preparing Creole and Nicaraguan cuisine. Many of their dishes feature seafood plucked straight from the waters just off Little Corn.

If eating local is important to you, dining out at establishments such as Rosa’s or the Sunset Shack Cafe will give fulfill this travel desire.

Try some wild tree fruit

As you walk along the paths that take you around Little Corn Island, you will notice many trees in the jungle that are weighed down with fruit such as mangoes and starfruit (ask locals what to look for  …  never eat anything you don’t recognize).

So long as you aren’t picking fruit off trees that sit on private property, you are in the clear. Large amounts of fruit fall off trees and rot on the ground uneaten, so don’t feel guilty about helping yourself to nature’s bounty as you explore the island.

Ask those building houses about Little Corn’s real estate market 

Spent a few days on the island and are daydreaming about becoming an expat yourself? There is no better person to ask then those that are doing what you seek to accomplish in the future.

If there is anybody that knows the current state of the market, pitfalls to watch out for, and great leads on lots for sale, it’s them.

They might actually have property for sale as well, so don’t be a wallflower: strike up a chat with one and you might get filled in on a deal that you can’t possibly refuse.

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